PAG logo

Google

BMW Oil Cooler

by

Mike Meakin

Since SVA last year I have put around 1200 miles on the Pembleton. With the French Pyrenees Rally and Le Mans Parade coming up in June, plus observations I have made when "extending" the car, an oil cooler seems to make sense. This has come about, I suspect, as a result of fitting an oil temperature gauge rather than just relying on the oil pressure gauge.

Loping along on a reasonable length journey along derestricted roads in the car I found that after some 10 minutes of sustained 65mph, the normal oil temperature of 80 to 90 degrees C rose to 100 degrees. Thereafter a burst of acceleration and even a mile or two at a steady 80mph saw the oil gauge needle rise to 110: losing 10 mph saw the reading drop back and returning to 60/65 mph, the reading quickly went back to 90 degrees. It was only after a "I wonder what she WILL do" jaunt, that I found the plastic SVA nut-caps on the oil filter housing were melting! Mindful of French temperatures in June, an oil cooler became a must.

Some BMW Boxers were fitted with a cooler as standard- retro fitting was an option, by way of a new filter housing plate with a flow and return tapping, with a new flow pipe in to the filter. I chose a half-width, 7 row matrix (effectively 8" X 2" X 2") , stainless braided hoses and silvered "Heritage" connections. The cooler is slightly larger than BMW provide (and about half the cost!). Function is by a simple 'differential pressure' system. The flow pipe inside the filter has a "blow hole": whilst the oil is cold there is too much pressure to allow flow through the cooler and it bleeds off in to the filter. As the oil gets hot and loses viscosity, it runs through the cooler and then the filter.

No information available No information available

The BMW engine has a footrest mount tunnel through the crankcase, just behind the filter housing. A length of studding through there will carry the cooler bracket (as well as my "junior "Zimmer" that bears the front number plate) with absolutely minimum hose length. A cooler sticking out of just one side of the engine spoils my 'symmetry' ideals for the car, but there's just nowhere to mount a one above the engine, 2CV style. For good measure, I've added a stainless woven stone guard to protect the gills of the cooler matrix.

Next bulletin will be how much difference it makes after installation.

(Attached pics show cooler and pipes assembled immediately after receipt and the completed assembly on an aluminium bracket made from 50mm X 6mm strip drilled to mount on the M12 stud, with the frame preventing rotation)

Mike Meakin

I received these follow-ups from Mike

David,

Oil Cooler fits to the car like so (attached). Important to make sure the oil filter housing can still be removed with everything in place.

Click to enlarge Click to enlarge

regards

Mike

David,

Successful leap up to Sleaford to Steve Scriminger's today. Oil cooler now fully functional and SUCH a difference : oil temperature now very consistent and only rises in heavy traffic, when there's little airflow though the matrix. Despite the misty/clammy weather, still a wonderful drive. The BMW engine really spins well and is at its best around 4,000/4,500 rpm - engine braking good from that speed, but still plenty of "lift" available.

Picture attached: I added a further bracket to brace the top of the cooler to prevent any flexing and some stainless mesh as a stoneguard.

regards

Mike


Valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional Valid CSS!