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E-mails to the editor

Hi David,

Claude Laubret's headlamps (see picture on contents page) are very similar to those favoured by Bugatti for their late '20s cars. The originals are Marchal - even the modern replicas for Bugatti are very expensive. The lamps on Claude's car are clear, flat lenses with "beam-maker" flutes in the reflector. They very much look the part, but I've yet to find out where Claude found them. I suspect (from the reflector design) that they're modern reproductions. The photo's from the 2009 Le Man Parade.

regards

Mike


There was a thread on the forum about how to deal with the upper seat belt point. Peter Gibbs send the following pic which may help people to see how it's done down under


I got these e-mails from Mike Meakin as a response to my questions on designing and making a tonneau cover and shortening the gear lever to reduce the throw

Hi David,

3 images taken on the same day. 4925 is the full tonneau view: 4926 is "driver only, spray panels in place, passenger area covered, driver's panel behind the seat, 4927 - close up of same. The spray guards are VERY effective when travelling on wet roads AFTER it's been raining. The sensation of driving with spray guards and passenger half "up" is a bit like sitting under a turret hatch(!) but you can still see the gauges.

regards

Mike

Hi David,

As you suspect, the seat belts are held under the tonneau when fitted in total, but there's a section of belts left outside - and the actual seat belt guide plate slots could let rain in to the boot. I simply have two bits of foam that I push in to the slots. In fact left open, little rain gets in through those slots - the guide plate is above the panel and the top of a "barrel". Personally, I'd keep the main tonneau simple - fashioning one which included covering the rear rail and seat belt guide plate would be quite demanding. You could make up an additional square "flap", sitting on 2 posts screwed in to the guide plate and 2 double length posts the other side of the rail?

Re the gearbox change lever, having made plenty of "match marks" to ensure everything stayed in the same planes, I got the local blacksmith to cut metal out of the straight centre of the lever, butt the two ends, then weld back together (the lever is solid, not hollow).My shortened lever is 4.5" (140mm) long

The movement across the gate is much reduced. I added a Sparco gearknob because it had a longer "post" underneath the ball. I've had no issues with it in 4 years.

regards

Mike


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