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Newsletter #71 - December 2018


Editoral Ramblings

by

The Editor

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Another year seems to have whizzed by with little to show. Some years ago I sent Peter Gibbs a set of disc brake calipers and he wanted to do something in return. As people might know Peter could and would mill things from billet aluminium. For example he made the footwells for Goliath from solid - anyhow he wondered what I'd like so I suggested a steering wheel boss. He used a CNC milling machine to make it with cut outs at the rear for the spokes and also engraved it with the car name and my name. I didn't think about how to mount it which meant I needed to do a bit of extra machining to be able to secure it from behind. I have been saving for a rainy day and decided that the rainy day had come. I splashed out on a new bench top milling machine (Sieg SX2.7) and some tooling. When I was back in Ireland I played with my new toy and did the required mods and the boss is now in place on the car. With hindsight I should have suggested a smaller font but it looks a lot better than the plain boss I made myself.

I noticed that one of the CVJ rubber boot has failed - the other side failed about a year ago. The rubber doesn't seem to be as rubbery as I would have expected. Start of old man's moan about 'progress' - rubber seems to have changed for the worse I have noticed that some modern inner tubes are made from something very synthetic and rubber solution doesn't stick at all. They also smell very strongly of creosote - end of moan


Jack Slaters first outing

Jack Salter send me this picture of his first outing in his car which he completed very quickly but I think the record is stil held by Phil with old number one. The grins on their faces says it all.


I did hope that I might get some reports of events that took place this autumn. The Citroën Specials Club ran a weekend event in the Lakes as a replacement for the 'Not 10,000ft' run in the Yorkshire Dales - did any Pembletons attend?I did think about going but I was in Ireland. This newsletter will only work if I get news!


Carrying the Gamp

by

Mike Meakin

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We have always travelled with a large, golf-type umbrella in Bolide. It's been useful in blistering, French sunshine and "au contraire", when it's persisting down so heavily that we HAVE to stop and there are no bridges/trees to duck under, to stem the flow of rain. The problem has always been that when not being used, the only place long enough to accommodate a furled gamp, over a meter long, has been against the passenger's cockpit side – inevitably, the pointed end or the handle imposes itself on "the passenger".

In The Wilbot, Colin Wilson managed to incorporate a long, slim, conical "scabbard" attached outboard of the passenger side. In a Pembleton, there just isn't the length or height to achieve the same, without looking like an ammunitions carrier.

Ten years down the road, we have a solution (initiated by Martin C for Bamm-Bamm) for gamp carrying in Bolide. A black canvas sheath (using material left over from the tonneau) houses the brolly. Two "bungees with balls" slip round the leather bonnet straps, holding the brolly with its point resting on the lamp bar and its handle just forward of the indicator repeater. When the car is parked up, the brolly and bungees go in the cockpit, under the tonneau. There doesn't appear any noticeable difference having a sheathed gamp on the bonnet side, as far as the car's performance is concerned.

Mike

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Moving The Carburettor

by

Nick Mohoney

Not wanting to cut the exhaust balance pipe on the front of the engine to be able to use the solex carburettor I thought I would try the approach Mike Bowden took and move the carburettor back to be under the bonnet. Cutting the branch pipes of the mainfold wasn't too difficult (Fig 1) but welding the manifold onto a support wasn't feasible for me simply due to not having a welder and not being able to weld if I did have one. So making use of the threaded studs protruding from the gear box case I managed to braze up and bend some rackets (fig 2) which allowed me to mount the carburettor partly over the gear box and partly over the starter motor using a combination of threaded rod and bolts and conical armour ring bolt covers to centralise the rod in the manifold assembly (fig 3 & 4) .The brackets felt a bit flimsy at first, but once bolted up on the gear box and manifold I found it was actually strong enough to pull the rolling chassis along by this mounting arrangement with no flexing or distortion.

I connected the manifold to the inlet ports using using fluro lined silicon hose and mounted the carburettor. It all fired up okay but,the silicon hoses collapsed gradually with the vacuum induced and caused the engine to stall.I bought some coil spring stiffeneers (fig 5) and put those inside the hoses and they seemed to do the job of keeping the shape. Covering the hoses with stainless steel braiding thankfully cut down on the lairyness of the hose colour. I didn't have the engineering skill of Mike to make up reversing levers for the throttle control, but by using generous curves on the throttle cable and choke cable (fig 6) I managed to get a reasonably a smooth action, helped by a stainless steel turnbuckle tension assembly from the front bulkhead onto the return spring ( fig 7). I had to do some adjustment to the gear lever on the splined spigot it sits on to avoid it colliding with the fueline but, the gear change seems fine.

How this lasts and performs long term, who knows!

Nick Mahoney

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Spark plug storage

by

Jack Salter

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I have long admired the cast aluminium holders for spare spark plugs found under the bonnet of vintage cars, so have made something along the same lines for my Super Sport, other may wish to do likewise.

The photo should be self explainatory. A 2½" long offcut of ¾" x 1" aluminium (left over from making spacers for the front suspension bump stops), tapped with M14 spark plug threads.

The VIN plate above the brake master cylinder is drilled and tapped 4BA to accept cap head bolts.

Regards, Jack Salter


Possible thoughts for new builders

by

Tom Rae

I am in the process of restoring Snotamog which has given pretty good service over the 8½ years it has been on the road and it has covered a few miles. This has given me the opportunity to incorporate (or leave out) modifications to the original concept that suit my specific needs. Some mods are my invention others are shamelessly copied from elsewhere. It was suggested to me that others may also want to consider some, or all, of the modifications. I am not trying to be a smart *ss or say it is the way to go and my metal working skills are somewhat basic so if I can do it you can almost definitely do it better. I have to say that I am thoroughly enjoying the rebuild process and can "commend it to the house".

Spring cans

1) Following grounding and droopy springs in the past and the odd clunk, I have abandoned the standard spring supports and reverted to the original Citroen spring cans, welded directly to the crossmember with a strap underneath just in case.

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2) I am fitting a bullet tail and I have built in the rear deck to add luggage space length.

3) I have added a higher front hoop, aft of the instrument panel to mount the Brooklands screens horizontally, this gives more cover from the elements for a softy.

Electrics compartment

4) The knife edges have been abandoned and replaced with rose joints. I halved the size of the glove box, making the further reaches into a separate compartment to house the electrics.

5) I am fitting an underslung gear change (thanks Mike) which conveniently frees up under bonnet space for stuff or to 7)

Tool box

6) Fit a toolbox in the released space under the bonnet.

Instrument cover and hatch

7) I have also made a cover for the rear of the instruments and an access hatch for clutch and accelerator cable replacement.

Swing arm hatch

8) Another access hatch will facilitate rear swing arm fitting and removal, I am surprised that the standard build has no such option requiring damaging metal surgery to remove the swing arm should attention be required.

Happy Building season

Tom


High Beam telltale Lens

by

Sam McIntyre

high beam indicator

They say the devil is in the detail, and that a Pembleton is never finished….

I’ve been occasionally bugged by the red telltale for high beam on my dash, red because the correct blue ones are difficult to find, and because at first glance you don’t know if it’s the potentially more significant oil, brake fluid or generator warning light. So I finally resolved to do something about it, after 8 years on the road!

A quick advert on the Forum produced a spare telltale from Niall (Thanks!), and I set about carefully drilling out the lens with progressively larger bits. A search round the house produced a cheap charity pen with that brittle translucent blue plastic on the rounded end. A sharp tool in the lathe reduced this to the right size, and a dab of superglue secured it. The photo shows the end result.


Retro Auto Moto Museu - Barcelona

by

Niall McLoughlin

Hi folks,

Back in October my wife and I went to Barcelona for a holiday. It's a great city with some very impressive architecture, history and culture and would highly recommend a visit. When we went in early October the weather was perfect for us (22-26degs every day). Warm, sunny and very pleasant.

I try and make it my business to fit at least one automobile related visit into any excursion - the wife is VERY understanding. I did a little research and one day we found ourselves at the Arc de Triomf. I knew we weren't far from a small motor museum and so using the wonders of Google Maps and smart phones managed to locate the "Retro Auto Moto Museu".

As you're walking down the little side street there's shops, bustling cafe's and bars to both sides all with typical front windows. Then there it is, a normal shop window, a normal shop frontage, but in the window is a 1903 yellow steam car looking at you! Aha! We've found it! At this point it was about 5pm in the afternoon, but the friendly chap on the desk explained that they were open until 7pm, longer if we required.

We duly paid the €8 entry fee and had a look around. The tiny frontage widened and disappeared into the distance with a row of cars leading down to a area of motorcycles and side cars, then upstairs to another area with further cars, and then again to a further display of motorcycles, monkey bikes and scooters. The whole museum was beautifully laid out so you could walk around nearly all of the exhibits and get as close as you wanted. There were no ropes or cordoned areas and it was filled with transport curios, vehicles and manufacturers I'd never heard of.

Quite a few of the vehicles were from the ex USSR days. A few ZAZs, early Tatras, an IFA, an FSO, cycle cars, early motorbikes and a whole bunch of vehicles from the dawn of motorised transport (including a converted horse carriage, a very early foray that turned into the motor car as we know and love today) including a smattering of vehicles from bygone British manufacturers including singer, Lea-Francis, Swallow etc.

After about 1hr 45 we were done and just as we were leaving I had a chat to the chap on the front desk, saying that I'd never seen such a wide and varied mix of cars and bikes that I'd never heard of before. He laughed and said that everyone said that. He explained that all the vehicles are owned by one chap and it was his private collection. He only bought cars that no one would ever have heard of, he wanted his collection to be an education. He went on to say that you could go to any museum and see a Ferrari or a Rolls Royce, but when was the last time you saw any of these cars?! I must admit… he was right and it made a VERY pleasant evening.

Seasons wishes, Niall

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